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Federal Circuit Upholds PTAB Ruling that Tradeshow Catalog is a Printed Publication

Despite previously affirming the ITC's decision that a dental tradeshow catalog was not publicly accessible, the Federal Circuit recently upheld the PTAB's opposite conclusion. The Federal Circuit explained that it was not bound by its prior affirmance of the ITC's judgment because it was based on a different factual record with a different burden of proof, i.e., preponderance of the evidence at the PTAB versus clear and convincing evidence at the ITC.

Prosecution
Author: Cynthia M. Bouchez, Ph.D.

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Interference-in-Fact Decision Highlights Importance of Reasonable Expectation of Success to Find Obviousness

While the recent holding in Univ. of California v. Broad Institute, Inc., will certainly have long-reaching and important implications in the fight for control over CRISPR-based technology, the Federal Circuit’s opinion also provides additional confirmation that an obviousness determination must demonstrate a “reasonable expectation of success” when combining references from the prior art.

Prosecution, Obviousness
Author: Jeffrey K. Mills, Ph.D.

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Patent Prosecutors Beware –Catalog Distributed to "Members Only" is Indeed a Printed Publication

A catalog distributed at a members-only trade show is a printed publication under 35 USC § 102(b). The Federal Circuit vacated and remanded a Board decision finding that an IPR challenger's catalog distributed at a trade show was not sufficiently available to the general public to qualify as a printed publication.  The Federal Circuit found that the Board failed to cite any cases where the Federal Circuit has "strictly held that the expertise of the target audience is dispositive of the inquiry of accessibility."

Prosecution, Inter Partes Review
Author: Cynthia M. Bouchez, Ph.D.

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Whether Easy or Complicated, Inventorship Determination Should be a Part of the Patent Drafting Process

For many patent practitioners, drafting a patent application based on an invention disclosure is one of the skills learned during the formative years of practice.  It often involves repeated discussions with inventors regarding the scope, focus and overall concept of the invention to be described.  What may not be a focus, however, is a full discussion of the contributions of those involved in the disclosure to determine whether they should be listed as inventors of the patent application.  A recent decision by the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) highlights the importance of these discussions, even though they may be difficult or unpleasant to conduct.

Prosecution, Inventorship
Author: Jeffrey K. Mills, Ph.D.

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